Culture & Art


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Culture & Art

Alfama, the oldest district of Lisbon

1 year ago - Léa D.

A story rich full of surprises Did you know that Alfama is a derivative of the Arabic "alfa maa", which means the thousand sources? Charming name for this emblematic and typical neighborhood of our city of a thousand colors! Located between the Castelo de Sao Jorge and Tagus, you will find many historical attractions and restaurants ... Let us guide you. Alfama is a very welcoming neighborhood with a village atmosphere. It is considered one of the oldest districts of the city and hosts every year several popular festivals such as that of St. Anthony of Padua from June 12 to 13. Dominated in turn by Eastern and Western influences, Alfama bears the imprint of the four corners of the world: that's what makes it so charming. The district has in its dominions a group of thermal sources, hence the origin of its name mentioned above. At the top of Alfama sits the famous Castelo de Sao Jorge, a medieval castle that was the royal residence until the sixteenth century. To observe the city and its monuments, it is necessary to reach the miradouros: that of Santa Luzia is one of the most known. Close to it is the Museum of Decorative Arts, a 17th century manor house with magnificent interiors. Located in the former palace of the Count of Azurara (17th century), this museum evokes everyday life in Lisbon in the 17th and 18th century through a succession of small intimate rooms decorated with azulejos and frescoes. The latter are adorned with Portuguese and Indo-Portuguese furniture, collections of silverware, Chinese porcelain and several tapestries from the 16th and 18th centuries. The 3rd floor has a temporary exhibition hall and a cafeteria with a welcoming patio. Address: Largo das Portas do Sol 2, 1100 Lisboa Phone: +351 218 881 991 Our best culinary addresses After a long walk, nothing beats a meal prepared with care! Pateo 13 For a picturesque dinner in the busy streets of Lisbon, nothing beats the Pateo 13: enjoy your fresh fish and white bread under musical notes played by street musicians: a moment full of life, filled with joy and satiation! Calçadinha de Santo Estêvão 13, 1100-219 Lisboa, Portugal Canto Da Vila A Brazilian restaurant in Lisbon: a place not to be missed. On a small terrace, enjoy a fresh mojito while choosing in which form you want to taste your cod ... Copious and delicious! Portugal 2, Rua Limoeiro, 1100-538 Lisboa, Portugal Fado Na Morgadinha The perfect place to eat and dance Fado, a traditional Portuguese music. You also have the possibility to just have a drink while admiring the dancers from the bar. Largo Peneireiro 5, 1100-219 Lisboa, Portugal Cruzes Credo For a vintage brunch, it's the place to be! A good burger, a salad accompanied by a fresh fruit juice: something to reinvigorate in after discovering the streets of Lisbon. R, Cruzes da Se 29, 1100-192 Lisboa, Portugal O Prego To enjoy a hamburger or tapas in a festive setting. Just like at home, come and restore yourself, O Prego! 18, Largo Menino de Deus 14, 1100-375 Lisboa, Portugal Must-See: The Fado Fado is a traditional Portuguese musical style. There is often a singer or a singer accompanied by two or three people with instruments (guitar, Portuguese guitar, at times violin and cello). The Fado is listened to in total silence, and puts forward a multitude of emotions (the saudade in Portuguese). In the district of Alfama, here are 2 places to discover fado: Fado em Si is an institution where all the big names of fado have occurred. Fine food, 4 to 5 professional fadistes each evening that offer a high quality service: the ideal conditions to discover the Portuguese tradition of fado. Arco de Jesus 7, Alfama, 1100-037 Museu do Fado (Fado Museum), where an outdoor concert is regularly held on the terrace. To discover the entire history of fado ... Largo do Chafariz of Dentro 1

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Alfama, the oldest district of Lisbon

Alfama, the oldest district of Lisbon

Culture & Art

Explore Lisbon aboard the mythical Tram 28

2 years ago - Valérie D.

The Lisbon trams are to the Portuguese capital what the red double-decker buses are to London: real time machines that are part of the scenery and which allow us to explore in the most picturesque ways. Line 28E is the most emblematic, offering a particularly wide range of discoveries, between monuments and hidden treasures. Born in 1914, the legendary line 28E ("E" for "eléctrico") of the Lisbon tramway serves the center of Lisbon and its hills. This hundred-year old means of transport is undoubtedly the best way to furrow the most beautiful steep streets, while sparing the tedious exercise of traversing these paved slopes on foot. If it still looks like a collector's toy, this "Remodelado" (historic tramway) has two qualities that modern trams do not have. There is of course the old-fashioned charm of this unique yellow car with polished wooden benches. But the bumpy vehicle has especially the technical possibility to take a circuit with tight turns, on steep hills. From its departure in Martim Moniz Square, until his arrival at the cemetery of Prazeres in the district of Campo Ourique, the 35 stops of line 28 can be done in a good forty minutes. But you can also choose to use it in a "hop on / hop off" style, spend the day exploring the most remarkable surroundings, and enjoy good addresses that we recommend here. Royal view from Graça Let's brush against the walls in the climb up on Graça Hill: here beats the heart of a popular Lisbon. It is in this area, a few minutes’ walk from the Rua de Graça stop, that you can access one of the most beautiful views of the city of Ulysses. Because who says hill, says point of view! Unmistakable, the Miradouro da Senhora do Monte is the highest, and certainly one of the most beautiful, lookouts of Lisbon. It offers a breathtaking view of the medieval Castelo de São Jorge, and a panoramic view of the old town until the 25th of April Bridge. The tram then passes right in front of the white monastery of São Vicente da Fora, museum and burial place of the Portuguese kings: take the time for a royal stopover. The cloister of this monastery is decorated with azulejos of the eighteenth century where the French tourist will easily recognize an illustration of 38 fables of the poet Jean de La Fontaine. Cloister which today houses the Royal Pantheon of the Braganza dynasty. It contains 44 tombs, including that of Queen Amelia (dona Amelia d'Orleans and Bragança), the last queen of Portugal, born in France. Then think of climbing to the terrace to enjoy a 360 ° view of the city called "Queen of the Tagus". Mosteiro e claustro de São Vicente da Fora – Largo de São Vicente Opening hours: Tuesday to Sunday, 10 am to 6 pm L’Alfama: postcard and cultural treasures We leave this old district of Graça to find another: the Alfama, just at your feet. The stop at Largo da Portas do Sol is a must for any stay in Lisbon. This image of Lisbon that we all have in mind is here: the red roofs, the white dome of the Pantheon, the blue of the Tagus. This is an opportunity to immerse your eyes in the soul of Lisbon from the wide terrace of the cocktail bar Portas Do Sol. In a lounge atmosphere, you can enjoy a brunch or a light meal and sip a ginja or a bica, while imagining walking narrow alleys (becos), stairs and vaulted passageways down the slopes. Portas Do Sol - Largo das Portas do Sol, Beco de Santa Helena Opening hours: Monday to Friday, 9 am to 7 pm A hundred meters further, the belvedere of Santa Luzia is another must to observe the city. Our # 28 streetcar continues its journey, shaking between the fine groceries stalls and other stores, in the typical neighborhood that survived the 1755 earthquake. Hop off! Not far, we can deepen cultural immersion by visiting the space A Arte da Terra, a cooperative showcasing and selling of Portuguese crafts in a vaulted decor, and where it is possible to taste local wines and pastries. A Arte da Terra - Rua Augusto Rosa 40 Opening hours: every day from 11h to 20h Visit poets in the Chiado district A few bends and jolts later, after crossing the district of Baixa, the journey of the small but legendary yellow tram continues in Chiado. You can greet the statue of the famous Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa, seated on the terrace of Café A Brasileira, which we mentioned in a previous post. The neighborhood boy, lover of coffee, was a regular at the now-century establishment. It is one of the oldest in the capital, an institution that has kept its 1900 decor, and its traditional public intellectuals (but now, many tourists). Some pasteis de nata and an espresso near his favorite table will perhaps inspire you a few verses in tribute to the beauties of Lisbon? The Chiado district is also named after the poet Antonio Ribeiro, said ... Chiado. Not surprising to find, a little further, the statue of another writer, Luis de Camoes, in the square of the same name. Popular, royal, the capital is here also literary. A Brasileira - Rua Garrett 20 Opening hours: every day from 8h to 2h An arrival under the lucky star of Estrela The journey of the tram 28 is about to end, even still before our eyes Lisbon monuments continue to flash: The National Assembly, or the funicular da Bica. It finally enters the historic district of Estrela, around its basilica of white marble in Baroque style. The Estrela Garden, just opposite, is a stop where you can stroll among the exotic trees or sit on a bench - much more relaxing than those often crowded with turbulent electrico. And since we are in the Etoile district, why not cap off your escapade with a dinner in a gourmet restaurant rewarded by the Michelin Guide? The Loco, located near the Basilica of Estrela, unveils to its customers its kitchens in a very fashionable decor. This establishment which sports a Michelin star is that of Alexandre Silva, first winner of Top Chef Portugal, who likes to value the local products. A perfect ending to end the trip so characteristic that offers the tram 28E in the heart of the various flavors of Lisbon. Loco - Rua Navegantes 53 Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday, from 7 pm to 11 pm Last tip before going on board: remember to bring your pass Viva Viagem 24h Carris network, and to choose your schedule to avoid the crowd.

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Explore Lisbon aboard the mythical Tram 28

Explore Lisbon aboard the mythical Tram 28

Culture & Art

Discover Lisbon in the footsteps of José Saramago

2 years ago - Julie D.

For lovers of novels, there are few more enjoyable pleasures than to discover a real place in the footsteps of a renowned writer. Fortunately for inveterate readers, Lisbon is not only a city of culture and history, but also the soul city of several great writers. If you already know the novels of José Saramago, Nobel Prize in Literature, you will find them with pleasure, like old friends. If you have not yet had the opportunity to discover his finely ironic prose, a stay in Lisbon is the perfect moment! Prepare your next stay in Lisbon by delving into the deeply human universe of José Saramago's novels. In Lisbon, you can visit the José Saramago Foundation, or follow the tourist route Memorial do Convento that will take you to the National Palace of Mafra, in the footsteps of Balthasar and Blimunda, heros of the novel that bears their names. Lisbon seen with the heart: José Saramago, who are you? José Saramago was born in 1922 in a small village north of Lisbon, in Azinhaga, in a family of poor peasants. His family moved to Lisbon two years after his birth. He spent most of his life in Lisbon, until his exile in Lanzarote in 1992, after a controversy that opposed the Portuguese government at the time. Pure Lisbon, Saramago loved this city which he knew every nook and cranny intimately. But he always remained attached to Azinhaga, the village of his childhood and the village of his grandparents. In his speech for the Nobel Prize of Literature in 1998, he tells how his grandparents gave him the taste of imagination, the love of nature, and an inexhaustible curiosity for Portuguese folklore. In one of his most recent books, The Notebook, which includes many texts that the writer first published on his blog, he wrote a real love letter in Lisbon: "I would be interested, not only to know, but also to see, in the true sense of the word, how Lisbon has changed since those days. If the cinema had existed then, if the ancient chroniclers had been cameramen, if the thousand and one changes that Lisbon has known throughout the centuries had been recorded, then we could have seen this Lisbon of eight centuries grow and move like a to be alive, like those flowers that the television shows us, which open in a few seconds, from the still closed button to the final splendor of shapes and colors. I think I would have liked this Lisbon more than anything.” (The Notebook, published by Cherche-Midi, Marie Hautbergue translation) As a child, he knows poverty: Every spring his mother would bring the table covers of the family to the pawnshop, in order to recover some money, and hoping to be able to buy them at the beginning of the winter ... Because of these difficulties, and although he is an excellent student, his parents cannot enroll him in college, private. He did technical studies before working as a mechanic. Saramago is already an avid reader, even though he is too poor to own his own books. At age 19, and with a loan from a friend, he bought his first books. Saramago also becomes a translator and a journalist. A prolific writer, he published numerous articles, poetry collections and several novels, before finally becoming famous at 60, with the publication of his novel Memorial do Convento. He died in 2010 and his ashes are buried in the shade of a century-old olive tree, in front of Casa dos Bicos, which houses the José Saramago Foundation. La Casa dos Bicos – Fondation José Saramago The very pretty Casa dos Bicos, literally "house of spikes", is a very interesting example of Portuguese architecture of the 16th century. Built in 1532 for Bras of Albuquerque, the son of the viceroy of the Portuguese Indies, it is decorated on its facade with sharp stones. Bras of Albuquerque, who oversaw its construction, was most likely inspired by examples from the Italian Renaissance, such as the Palazzo dei Diamanti in Ferrara. Casa dos Bicos suffered enormous damage during the earthquake of 1755. Its two upper floors were only rebuilt in 1983, respecting the original appearance of the house, with its double-pointed windows. Since 2012, the Casa has hosted the José Saramago Foundation, with a permanent exhibition dedicated to the life and work of the Nobel Prize winner for literature. The exhibition gathers personal effects and manuscripts of the author and recreates his workplace. Casa dos Bicos – Fondation José Saramago – Rua dos Bacalhoeiros, 10, 1100-135 Lisbonne – opening hours: from Monday to Saturday 10h à 18h In the footsteps of Saramago, from Lisbon to Mafra: la Rota Memorial Do Convento Recently inaugurated, the brand new cultural route "Memorial do Convento" offers the opportunity for a pleasant excursion, on the real sites that inspired José Saramago for his novel. The route starts in Lisbon, Praça da Figueira, goes through Casa do Bicos, continues to Sacavem, where visitors will discover an information center on the cultural route to the municipal library Ary dos Santos. We then arrive in Loures, to discover several sites of the city. The route ends at Mafra, and of course includes the National Palace, which serves as a backdrop to the novel. This cultural tour, which has just been inaugurated, will include a website and an app. Baltasar and Blimunda is the novel that serves as a guide for this journey. It transports us to the 18th century, during the construction of the Mafra Palace. The novel tells of the loves of Balthasar, a one-handed worker involved in the construction of the palace, and Blimunda, a young woman with a singular gift of clairvoyance. They participate in the development of a magic flying machine, but the Inquisition does not see all of this with a very good eye... The national palace of Mafra The literary route ends at the National Palace of Mafra, 40km from Lisbon, in the province of Arrabida. To celebrate the birth of an heir, John V of Portugal honored his promise to build a Franciscan monastery. Originally, it was to be a simple and austere monastery to accommodate 13 Franciscan monks who took a vow of poverty. But two years after the beginning of the project, John V changes his mind: the cases of the Crown are full thanks to the gold coming from Brazil, Portuguese colony, and John V decides to build, not a humble monastery, but a sumptuous palace that will serve as a second home and hunting lodge for the royal family. Four acres, 1200 rooms, 156 stairs and 29 courtyards, the least we can say is that John V refused nothing! The palace, built entirely of marble and stone from the region, is richly decorated with sculptures and paintings commissioned by the greatest Italian masters of the time. Today, we appreciate the vast library of 36,000 volumes, the 6 organs of the basilica and the sumptuous decoration of this palace, a masterpiece of the Baroque, which could well deserve the name of Portuguese Versailles ... what would the heroes of Saramago have said, who died before the palace was finished!

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Discover Lisbon in the footsteps of José Saramago

Discover Lisbon in the footsteps of José Saramago

Culture & Art

Neighborhoods of Lisbon to visit: seven ways to live Lisbon

2 years ago - Julie D.

The City of Seven Hills is famous for its different neighborhoods. All the main areas of Lisbon to visit, have a personality and a charm of their own. To go see them is to discover seven (or more!) very different ways of living in the city. Seven hills, seven districts of Lisbon to visit ... The Portuguese capital owes, perhaps, her charm to the magic number! From North to South and from East to West, follow the guide to appreciate the specificities of Lisbon’s neighborhoods to visit. Parque das Nações This neighborhood of Lisbon is a recent one, renovated and largely rebuilt for the 1998 Lisbon World Exposition. Once the old industrial wasteland was redone and pumped, it was able to accommodate eleven million visitors. Today, the Parque das Nações is open to all, and you can enjoy the gardens on the banks of the Tagus, or visit the Oceanarium, which is the largest in Europe. It has also been voted the world's best Oceanarium in 2017. The aquarium contains 5 million liters of seawater and allows you to discover the fauna and flora of the oceans. But beware, we only see fish! The adorable sea otters and penguins are also there to remind us that mammals and birds are part of the marine ecosystems. An ideal family program. Lisbon Oceanarium - Parque das Nações - open every day from 10am to 7pm in winter and until 8pm in summer (closed in the morning on December 25th and January 1st) - adult ticket € 16,20, children from 4 to 12 and elderly € 10.80. For the shopaholics, the former main entrance to the Expo has been transformed into a shopping center. The Vasco de Gama shopping center brings together most of the major international brands. Vasco da Gama Shopping Center - Parque das Nações - open daily from 9am to midnight, shops open from 10am to midnight. Alfama Alfama is the oldest neighborhood in Lisbon to visit, it even resisted the earthquake of 1755. Its name comes from the Arabic Al-Hamma, which means a hot spring. Historically, it was the fishermen and seamen's district, on the banks of the Tagus River, and still retains the reputation of being a popular district. It is a charming maze of medieval streets, and it also houses the monumental castle of Saõ Jorge, first "castle of the Moors" before being reconquered by the Christians in 1147. From the castle, there is a magnificent view of the Tagus and the city. To enjoy other panoramic views of Lisbon's neighborhoods, you have to go to one of the many miradouros, or belvederes. The Miradouro de Santa Luzia, not far from the castle, makes it possible to make a halt up high. The other monument of Alfama is the Cathedral of Santa Maria Maior, simply called "the Sé". Its construction began at the time of the capture of the castle, in 1147, to celebrate the Christian reconquest. It is an Augustus - and austere - Gothic monument of gray stone, which has experienced many vicissitudes. Baixa, or Baixa Pombalina Continuing along the Tagus, we arrive at one of the most famous neighborhoods of Lisbon to visit: the Baixa, in other words the lower city. Built according to innovative architectural and urban principles after the 1755 earthquake, La Baixa is an elegant, airy neighborhood with wide avenues on a grid floor, where streets intersect at right angles. Right on the banks of the Tagus River, you will appreciate the beauty of Praça do Comércio, with its pretty cobblestones forming a geometric pattern. In the middle, the monumental statue of José I serves as a focal point and, all around the square, arcades are home to shops and cafes. To appreciate this Lisbon neighborhood, it is best to walk around the beautiful, well-aligned streets like Rua Augusta. From Praça do Comércio, one passes under the magnificent and aerial triumphal arch, which can be visited. For € 2.50, you can take an elevator and two stairs to reach the top. In Rua Augusta the MUDE is found, the Museum of Design and Fashion, which houses a fascinating collection of 20th century design. MUDE - Rua Augusta 24, 1100. And if you go to Lisbon in April or September, you may have the chance to discover the mysterious Roman galleries underground. They are only open a few days a year, upon registration, so do not miss the opportunity! Galerias Romanas da Rua da Prata - Rua da Prata 77, Lisbon 1100 - 026 The Chiado Continue up Rua Augusta to Chiado, one of Lisbon's most famous shopping districts. Chic neighborhood, Chiado is full of fine shops, clothes, books, jewelry, but also museums and cafes. It is in this district that there is A Brasileira, the coffee of predilection of Fernando Pessoa, with its superb facade decorated with a fresco of azulejos. Café A Brasileira - 120 Rua Garrett, Lisbon 1200-205 - open daily from 8am to 2am To bring back a truly Portuguese object and to discover the young creators of the country, we must go to A Vida Portuguesa, cave of Ali-Baba which we spoke about in a previous post. Chiado is one of the most beautiful areas of Lisbon to visit; you have never stopped discovering its secrets at the corner of an alley, or at the corner of a small square. Square Luis de Camoes, for example, with its splendid white stone facades and small Art Deco stand, is well worth the detour. It signals the boundary between Chiado and Bairro Alto. The Bairro Alto The Bairro Alto, which sleeps during the day and lives at night, is the neighborhood of night owls. For over 20 years, it's here that we meet friends for a drink and enjoy the beautiful summer nights. Among the many good addresses, we recommend Portas Largas, with its generous cocktails; fans of mojitos will go to Clube da Esquina; and the audacious ones will go to Arroz Doce to ask for a "kick", a "Pontapé". Everywhere, or almost, live music and crazy parties! Portas Largas - R. Da Atalaia 105, 1200-037 Clube Da Esquina – R. Da Barroca 30, 1200-036 Arroz Doce – R. Da Atalaia 119, 1200-383 Belém We must now go beyond the bridge of April 25 to meet in Belém, the homeland of the famous pasteis of Belém. The emblem of the district is the massive defensive tower of Belém, which guard the entrance to the Tagus. With its graceful crenels, it is recognized from afar. The Jerónimos Monastery, with its imposing white Manuelian facade, impresses with the delicacy of its sculptures, particularly in the cloister and in the Church of St. Mary. This immense and sumptuous architectural ensemble was financed thanks to the great voyages of discovery of the Renaissance. These trips are celebrated by the Monument of the discoveries, inaugurated in 1960. Torre de Belém - Av. Brasília, 1400-038 - open from 10am to 5.30pm in winter, until 6.30pm in summer, closed on Mondays and some holidays. Jeronimos Monastery - Praça do Império 1400-206 - open from 10am to 5.30pm in winter, until 6.30pm in summer, closed on Mondays and some holidays. Monument of the Discoveries - Av. Brasília, 1400-038 - open from 10am to 18pm and closed on Mondays in winter, open every day in summer, until 19h, closed on certain holidays. Alcântara And here is the last of Lisbon's main neighborhoods, Alcântara, the dockland district in the Tagus Estuary. From Belém, you can walk pleasantly along the promenade along the river, to the bridge of 25 April. Since the 1990s, Alcântara has become the district of night clubs: separated from the residential districts by commercial buildings, it allows the party-goers to enjoy the night without disturbing the residents. During the day, one can also visit one of the many restaurants on the docks, the "Docas de Santo Amaro". Doc Cod serves the traditional bacalhau as well as grilled meat over a wood fire in a pleasant setting above the marina. A bit further, the restaurant Ardemar serves delicious Mediterranean cuisine with a typical Portuguese touch. Doc Cod - Doca de Santo Amaro, Armazem 16, 1350-353 Ardemar - Docas of Santo Amaro, Armazem 4, 1350-353

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Neighborhoods of Lisbon to visit: seven ways to live Lisbon

Neighborhoods of Lisbon to visit: seven ways to live Lisbon

Culture & Art

Discover Largo do Carmo and its romantic charm

2 years ago - Julie D.

Largo do Carmo is a small quiet place on the heights of Lisbon. To be discovered during those moments when the crowd of tourists has moved away, it has a discreet charm, with its fountain surrounded by jacarandas. Instead of hurrying to take the Santa Justa lift, you can go up the alleys of Chiado, before reaching Largo do Carmo all while savoring the peaceful atmosphere that emanates from this place. A small square to discover in the spring, in the middle of the flowers The Largo do Carmo is particularly spectacular between mid-May and early June, when the jacarandas, also called blue flamboyant, bloom. These trees originating from South America, and especially from Brazil, are covered with clusters of flowers of a delicate violet blue. These are the same trees that adorn the gardens of Mamounia in Marrakech. In the middle, a graceful fountain thrones the square, also known as Chafariz do Carmo. This is the only niche type fountain in Lisbon: four pillars meet above the basin, connected by four arches surmounted by dolphins. Built in 1771, it was designed by Reinaldo Manuel dos Santos, in a style that mixes classical and baroque. At number 18, Fernando Pessoa lived from 1908 to 1912 in a small rental room. The Elevador de Santa Justa is not a must... Most travel guides take great care to recommend using the Santa Justa lift. This "elevador" is one of the four that Lisbon has. In the city of seven hills, it would be necessary to climb, at one time or another ... The famous elevadores, symbols of the city and cherished of the tourists, partly solved the problem, providing a means of rapid ascent and easy to the places in the city where the elevation is a little rough. The particularity of the elevador of Santa Justa is to be a real lift, while the other three, the ascensores of Lavra, Gloria and Bica, are funiculars that used to function hydraulic powered and today with electricity. All were designed by the same engineer, Raoul Mesnier du Ponsard. Contrary to the legend, Mesnier du Ponsard was not the student, or even the admirer, of Gustave Eiffel, with whom he had no connection, although it is true that many see similarities between the Santa Justa lift and the Eiffel Tower. The Elevador de Santa Justa was built in 1902, in a graceful neo-Gothic end of century style, and connects the Rua de Santa Justa to Largo do Carmo. At Rua de Santa Justa, its slender silhouette forms a surprising contrast with the street, which seems suddenly narrow, and the buildings, that the elevador dominates from the top of its 45 meters. At the top, an ornate metal walkway connects the elevator cabin to Largo do Carmo; You can also climb to the belvedere, which gives a magnificent panoramic view. However, one can put in front of the influx and the long wait: at peak periods, it is necessary to queue between 20 minutes and one hour to take the elevator, very popular with tourists. While the same walk takes only a few minutes - if you do not linger on the way in front of the windows of the many shops of Chiado... So, remember, the possibility of having, from the bridge or from the lookout, a breathtaking view of the hills of Lisbon, the Tagus, the roofs of the city, and the Convent of the Carmelites. However, no need to take the elevator to enjoy all these beauties. Elevador de Santa Justa - entrance included in the Lisbon Card or CARRIS / METRO Pass 24h, or € 5,15 for the elevator, plus € 1,50 for the belvedere (access to the bridge free). Convento do Carmo and the Archaeological Museum of Carmo The Largo do Carmo square takes its name from the former Carmo Convent, founded in 1389 and largely destroyed by the 1755 earthquake. The building has never been (purposefully) restored. the only building in Lisbon that gives an idea of ​​the extent of the damage. This gives it, even under the intense sapphire sky and the hot summer sun, an aura of melancholy. Sic transit gloria mundi... The imposing exterior walls of the old church stand upright and white like cliffs; but when you get inside, you are surprised to see the majestic arches that rise into the void, the earthquake completely destroyed the roof. We thus enter an open church with a very special charm. Only a small part of the interior survived. In an apse of the church has found refuge a small archaeological museum with eclectic sympathy. There are scattered remnants of all periods of Portuguese history, Gothic tombs (including that of Denis I The Laborer, which features scenes of hunting boar), fountains, steles, windows from all over Portugal. On the gothic sarcophagi, the carved scenes show a luxury of detail: that of Don Fernando I presents on one of its faces a bucolic landscape of groves, with in the foreground a staircase on which a small individual sat to read, at the exit of a church. The collection also includes prehistoric artefacts discovered during a search on the site of Azambuja, in the Alentejo region, dating from 3500 to 1500 BC Finally, for those who have the heart well attached, or who dream of Indiana Jones, two pensive Peruvian mummies of the 16th century look at the visitors, squatting in their windows. Convento do Carmo and Archaeological Museum - Largo do Carmo, 1200-092 Lisboa - entrance 4 € - from Monday to Saturday, from 10h to 18h in winter (October to May), and from 10h to 19h in summer (June to September) - Closed Sunday, December 25, New Year's Day and May 1st. The Church of Saint-Roch and its museum – Igreja de São Roque The austere white facade of the Saint-Roch church hides well its game. Under a very severe and, at the same time, boring exterior, it contains a most sumptuous interior. The side chapels adjoining the main nave are, each in their own way, a jewel of Baroque art. The most impressive, and rightly so, is the chapel of St. John the Baptist, in the Rococo style. It is a debauchery of gold, silver, marble and precious stones, agates, lapis lazuli, amethysts. The striking scenes of the Apocalypse are recreated in mosaics: some of the tesserae that make up these paintings do not measure more than 3mm. Commissioned by King John V the Magnanimous, the chapel was created in Rome by two Italian artists, then blessed by the Pope himself, before being dismantled piece by piece and transported by boat to Lisbon. The chapel is separated from the church by a balustrade of green marble; on the floor, a mosaic of fine stones represents the armillary sphere, symbol of the kings of Portugal. Lapis lazuli columns seem to support a hexagonal vault decorated with heads of putti. The rest of the church, “soberer” (if we can speak of sobriety for baroque art), is beautiful. The ceiling tricks the eyes, the azulejos, the vaults of the chapels, the twisted columns decorated with vine leaves, give the whole a haughty serenity. In the professed house, next to the church is a small museum of religious art, which also houses the treasure of the chapel of St. John the Baptist. This part of the museum was formerly the home of the Jesuit brothers who founded the church. Do not forget to spend some soothing moments in the cloister, decorated with a landscaped garden that brings together four species of bamboo around a rectangular water mirror. Igreja de São Roque and Museum of Religious Art - Largo Trindade Coelho, 1200-470 Lisboa - Baixa-Chiado Metro - free entrance to the church, museum € 2.50 - museum open from 10am to 6pm (7pm in summer) from Tuesday to Sunday and from 14h to 18h on Monday - closed on January 1st, Easter Sunday, May 1st and December 25th.

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Discover Largo do Carmo and its romantic charm

Discover Largo do Carmo and its romantic charm